The Numbers Are In: 2014 in Reading Stats

I love stats. Numbers, pie charts, graphs, comparisons: it all makes me giddy. Reading stats are no exception. Without further ado...



I use this spreadsheet to track my reading (the first tab is where I input all data; the second tab contains all calculations). Feel free to grab it for yourself if you're interested in tracking your own reading stats; I'm happy to help adjust formulas or answer questions if I can!

17 comments

  1. Love this! It was a weird year for me, but overall I'm happy with the way it went. I'm hoping to further increase the diversity of my reading in 2015. Cheers!

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  2. I love seeing stats from someone who has kept track for several years, it's always so interesting to me! I totally get the love for podcasts...I think they're the main reason I don't really listen to audiobooks much at all.

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  3. That spreadsheet is fantastic! I saved a copy to track my reading in 2015. Thank you for sharing it!

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  4. I love your graphs! I was too lazy to write a comparison of stats from previous years, but I love seeing how other people's reading habits change from year to year.

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  5. Love love love your infographic and your spreadsheet. Very impressed with all of the formulas you have set up. I was using pivot tables but I may need to try your way so I can see stats quicker

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  6. Thanks! I had fun playing with it. The tricky part about formulas for the spreadsheet is that you (as with all data) have to make sure the data going IN is just so so that the formulas are counting the right things. This was my 4th year with this spreadsheet and it has evolved so much over time... definitely a work in progress still.

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  7. I hadn't compared year to year before last year (partially because I kept shifting what I was tracking), but I do think it is interesting to see. Last year, for example, was a really big year for big books for me (20 books over 500 pages, which explains why I read 20 less books last year but ~4,000 more pages).

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  8. I hope it works for you! The formulas in tab 2 can be a little particular about HOW the data entered in tab 1 is counted, but I like that it does all the counting for me now ;-)

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  9. Oh yeah, the podcasts have totally captured my attention. That and I now work from home, so my daily 30-60 minutes in the car is no longer (something for which I am eternally grateful, but it does diminish my listening time). I still have 1-2x week trips into Baltimore and/or DC, so tend to catch up on audio then, but have found that I prefer shorter formats (like podcasts) for road trips. Makes the time pass more quickly!

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  10. I'm with you on the diversity focus for 2015. I can do better than I have (and should!).

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  11. Whoa. Where did you get all of your graphs and whatnot? That is so cool!



    I'm seeing a lot of bloggers give some screen time to diversity this year. Even with my concerted effort and my expanded definition (authors OR main character of color, authors OR main characters who are LGBT, authors OR main characters who are differently abled), I was only around 30% diverse in my reading. But at least we're all having the dialogue with ourselves and with each other, which is a great place to start!

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  12. Emma @ Words And PeaceJanuary 4, 2015 at 2:09 AM

    neat graphs and stats, love it! here are mine: http://wordsandpeace.com/2015/01/03/year-of-reading-2014-part-2/

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  13. I've never used infogra.m before, how do you get the data into the cool graphs that you did? I tried lookin up how-tos online but none really answered my qs. Up until now I've just been using goodreads to keep track of rough categories of pages read and genres/series/fic/nfic and such. Tedius to enter!

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  14. I keep track of all of my stats in a spreadsheet each year (nerd, I know, but I love it!), and then input the data in Infogr.am (an online infographic tool), which builds the graphs. It's actually pretty simple!


    I think you're right about the importance of the dialogue. I used to do a lot of work in the energy efficiency space, and there are myriad studies proving that just benchmarking energy use in a building or home results in reduced usage over time. I think just looking at the basic info on diversity is a big first step for readers and reviewers (and publishers and booksellers, etc.) and the conversation can go from there.

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  15. Thanks! And thanks for sharing your link-headed there in a moment!

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  16. It's pretty easy in Infogram--you select what type of graph or chart you want, and then when you click on it, it opens the data fields. You can just replace the sample data and fields with your own!


    I'm not wild about Goodreads stats functionality (or at least, I wasn't three years ago when I first started my own spreadsheet); I just use the social portion of Goodreads to see what others in my network are reading and what they want to read, and track the stats myself.

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  17. I love your inforgraphics and this year I stole your idea and made one for my reading stats too :)

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Thanks for stopping by!